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Vulnerable Persons and COVID-19

By , | April 07, 2020

Who are considered vulnerable persons? People over the age of 70 are considered vulnerable, even if they do not have an underlying health condition. This also applies to those who are pregnant. Others considered vulnerable include people who have:


Who are considered vulnerable persons?

People over the age of 70 are considered vulnerable, even if they do not have an underlying health condition. This also applies to those who are pregnant.

Others considered vulnerable include people who have:

- Chronic (long-term) respiratory diseases, such asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), emphysema, or bronchitis 

- Chronic heart disease, such as heart failure

- Chronic kidney disease

- Chronic liver disease, such as hepatitis

- Chronic neurological conditions, such as stroke, Parkinson’s disease, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis (MS), a learning disability or cerebral palsy

- Diabetes

- Problems with your spleen – for example, sickle cell diseaseor if you have had your spleen removed

- A weakened immune system as the result of conditions such as HIV and AIDS, or medicines such as steroid tablets or chemotherapy

- Being seriously overweight (a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or above)

Those with underlying health conditions which put them at higher risk of severe illness if they contract coronavirus must stay at home to protect themselves.

What to do if you are part of the Vulnerable Group?

If you fall into this group, prevention is key. With your pre-existing condition, the risk that you will face in case you get coronavirus is higher chance of complications. 

Remember to incorporate in your daily routine these simple basics:

- Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

- Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue & throw away; or cough or sneeze into your long sleeve at the elbow fold.

- Stay home from work if you’re sick or at increased risk.

- Avoid touching surfaces in public.

- Try not to touch your face.

- Avoid people who seem visibly sick.

- Practice social (physical) distancing when in public or in any gatherings. Maintain a 6-foot perimeter around you.

- If there is an active virus in your area, consider totally avoiding crowded places.

- If there is no active virus near you, remember your personal health condition before deciding to go to a place where there are a number of people. 

- In the event that you are advised to stay home due to the coronavirus epidemic, consider how you will manage your condition and prepare for it.

Helpful tips that will assist you in this situation:

- Make sure you can reach your doctor quickly. Secure important phone numbers, emergency numbers, and email addresses of your healthcare providers and store in an accessible place. Check also if your doctor is available for electronic consult or instant messaging.

- If you live alone, make a list of your contacts (family or friends) that you might call in case of an emergency and keep it where it is readily available.

- Make sure you have a stock of your medications. Make sure you have enough for an extended time. Figure out how you can refill in case your stock gets depleted. Check pharmacies or drugstores for possible online order and delivery.

- Store enough food, beverage and hygiene supplies for yourself, your family and your pets.

If you feel any symptoms including cough and fever, contact your doctor. If you experience shortness of breath or other heart attack or stroke warning signs, call the nearest hospital that is heart attack and/or stroke ready.

The Medical City is a heart attack and stroke ready hospital. Call the Emergency hotline at 8-689-8153.


Sources:

https://www.heart.org/en/around-the-aha/coronavirus-precautions-for-patients-others-facing-higher-risks

https://www.nidirect.gov.uk/articles/coronavirus-covid-19-advice-vulnerable-people



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Vulnerable Persons and COVID-19

By ,

April 07, 2020


Who are considered vulnerable persons? People over the age of 70 are considered vulnerable, even if they do not have an underlying health condition. This also applies to those who are pregnant. Others considered vulnerable include people who have:

Who are considered vulnerable persons?

People over the age of 70 are considered vulnerable, even if they do not have an underlying health condition. This also applies to those who are pregnant.

Others considered vulnerable include people who have:

- Chronic (long-term) respiratory diseases, such asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), emphysema, or bronchitis 

- Chronic heart disease, such as heart failure

- Chronic kidney disease

- Chronic liver disease, such as hepatitis

- Chronic neurological conditions, such as stroke, Parkinson’s disease, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis (MS), a learning disability or cerebral palsy

- Diabetes

- Problems with your spleen – for example, sickle cell diseaseor if you have had your spleen removed

- A weakened immune system as the result of conditions such as HIV and AIDS, or medicines such as steroid tablets or chemotherapy

- Being seriously overweight (a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or above)

Those with underlying health conditions which put them at higher risk of severe illness if they contract coronavirus must stay at home to protect themselves.

What to do if you are part of the Vulnerable Group?

If you fall into this group, prevention is key. With your pre-existing condition, the risk that you will face in case you get coronavirus is higher chance of complications. 

Remember to incorporate in your daily routine these simple basics:

- Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

- Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue & throw away; or cough or sneeze into your long sleeve at the elbow fold.

- Stay home from work if you’re sick or at increased risk.

- Avoid touching surfaces in public.

- Try not to touch your face.

- Avoid people who seem visibly sick.

- Practice social (physical) distancing when in public or in any gatherings. Maintain a 6-foot perimeter around you.

- If there is an active virus in your area, consider totally avoiding crowded places.

- If there is no active virus near you, remember your personal health condition before deciding to go to a place where there are a number of people. 

- In the event that you are advised to stay home due to the coronavirus epidemic, consider how you will manage your condition and prepare for it.

Helpful tips that will assist you in this situation:

- Make sure you can reach your doctor quickly. Secure important phone numbers, emergency numbers, and email addresses of your healthcare providers and store in an accessible place. Check also if your doctor is available for electronic consult or instant messaging.

- If you live alone, make a list of your contacts (family or friends) that you might call in case of an emergency and keep it where it is readily available.

- Make sure you have a stock of your medications. Make sure you have enough for an extended time. Figure out how you can refill in case your stock gets depleted. Check pharmacies or drugstores for possible online order and delivery.

- Store enough food, beverage and hygiene supplies for yourself, your family and your pets.

If you feel any symptoms including cough and fever, contact your doctor. If you experience shortness of breath or other heart attack or stroke warning signs, call the nearest hospital that is heart attack and/or stroke ready.

The Medical City is a heart attack and stroke ready hospital. Call the Emergency hotline at 8-689-8153.


Sources:

https://www.heart.org/en/around-the-aha/coronavirus-precautions-for-patients-others-facing-higher-risks

https://www.nidirect.gov.uk/articles/coronavirus-covid-19-advice-vulnerable-people


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